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Three Window Film Buzzwords and Why You Shouldn’t Care.


Regularly used in business to gain attention, buzzwords in the window film industry are slick-sounding and science-based. But what do they mean, and how do they stack up to real-life window film performance?


Regularly used in business to gain attention, buzzwords in the window film industry are slick-sounding and science-based. But what do they mean, and how do they stack up to real-life window film performance? Let's dive into the following most popular phrases and why you shouldn't care:




 


Ceramic

Just because it contains ceramic compounds DOES NOT automatically make it better. It is simply a component that CAN be used during the window film manufacturing process.



These elements are heat-resistant, non-metallic, non-organic solids generally made up of metallic and non-metallic elements. Ok, sure? In our everyday lives, we find ceramic compounds in touch screens, spark plugs, cooktops, brake pads, skis, and bearings – to name a few. In window film manufacturing, ceramic compounds are used to help insulate the windows.



Why shouldn’t you care?

Because ALL window films insulate windows and have their own specific performance parameters. Just because it contains ceramic compounds DOES NOT automatically make it better. It is simply a component that CAN be used during the window film manufacturing process. No different than baking cookies with butter, olive oil, applesauce, or Crisco – these ingredients are not inherently “better” than the other. They provide different paths to a cookie goal.




 



Nanotechnology

Using this word is JUST describing the science behind HOW window film is made. It has no basis in measuring competitive product peformances.



This is a general scientific term to describe the working or manipulating of dimensions and tolerances of less than 100 nanometers, especially manipulating individual atoms and molecules. From sunscreens to car paints and computers – our world is filled with elements manipulated by scientists to be really, really small. Quality window film manufacturers use nanotechnology to make their products very thin and transparent.



Why shouldn’t you care?

The very existence of the window film market depended on advances in nanotechnology, and without using this area of science, we wouldn't be able to see through the tint, nor would it be as thin. Using this word is JUST describing the science behind HOW window film is made. It is not performance related (unless particular nanoparticulate sizes or compounds are mentioned). It has no basis in measuring competitive products.



 


Infrared Rejection - IR Rejection

IR rejection is not the best representative number for comparing the energy performance of window films.


Infrared wavelengths are part of the solar radiation spectrum and are present from 700 to 1,000nm. However, the human eye can only detect visible light within 400-700nm. So, we can't actually "see" IR, but we can feel it as heat. Blocking MORE of this is excellent for window film, especially if we want to keep our homes or businesses cooler in the summer months,



Why shouldn’t you care?

Heat energy is present in the entire solar radiation spectrum. IR rejection is not the best representative number for comparing the energy performance of window films. TSER, the Total Solar Energy Rejection, is the industry standard showing the actual energy-blocking performance of a window tint across the entire spectrum, not just the IR wavelength range.



 


Don’t be seduced by fancy marketing speak. Work with SOLARIS, and we'll help you navigate the options by finding the perfect combination of your desired energy performance, budget, and look – without the puffery.


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